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Stauffer extends exam period hours

Students will be able to study at Stauffer library around the clock during exam period this year because the library will be open 24 hours from Nov. 27 to Dec. 31.

“It’s really extending the use of a great facility,” said Martha Whitehead, associate university librarian. “Stauffer is in such heavy use right now. It seemed the demand was there, so we wanted to meet the demand.”Continue...

Mayoral candidates duke it out

All three mayoral candidates can agree on one thing: Queen's students need to vote.
Rosen, councillor Kevin George and councillor Rick Downes participated in a discussion and debate Friday at the Policy Studies Building.
About 100 members of the Queen’s and Kingston community attended the debate.Continue...

Intramural curlers get shuttle to new rink

The Royal Kingston Curling Club, where the University’s teams usually play, is moving from 75 Clergy St. to a new $3-million facility on Days Road, near the Kingston Airport, about three kilometres from campus. Because of the distance to the new rink, Queen’s will provide a shuttle for students. The shuttle will leave campus 20 minutes before the games and bring students back to campus at the end of the night.Continue...

Hitchcock holds open office hours

Queen’s students got an invitation last week to make a trip to the principal’s office, but not for detention or study hall:

Principal Karen Hitchcock is holding open office hours.Continue...

Negotiating aid with a non-nuclear family

The process of applying for financial aid can sometimes be arduous, but for students whose parents are divorced or separated, or who come from blended family situations, it can become even more complicated and confusing, said Teresa Alm, associate university registrar (awards).

When assessing a student’s family’s financial ability to contribute to the cost of university, the government looks solely at the income of a student’s legal guardian or guardians.Continue...

What it’s like to live on welfare

Last Saturday morning, while some students recovered from a night out or studied for upcoming midterms, myself and 24 others were filling out welfare applications.

Although not particularly challenging, the four-page document did provoke some questions from everyone. Superan, Insur. Ben., or Seg. Funds? It sounded like a cryptic language and I was fumbling for some sort of guide.
This form was followed by yet another, a 10 page “Determination of Spousal Status” document that sought to uncover who did the grocery shopping at my house and whether I ever opened my co-resident’s mail.Continue...

AMS endorses Rosen for mayor

AMS Assembly wants Harvey Rosen to be the next mayor of Kingston.

The endorsement vote came last night at Assembly’s meeting in City Hall, and was the first time in recent history the student government threw its weight behind a candidate.

AMS Municipal AffairsCommissioner Ryan Quinlan-Keech said the AMS felt strongly about endorsing a candidate, but doesn’t want to make up students’ minds for them.Continue...

A look at asbestos on campus

Sixty buildings on campus contain asbestos, but the University’s Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Director Dan Langham said it doesn’t pose a health hazard to students.

Asbestos is an insulation material that can be a health hazard and carcinogen when disturbed and particles become airborne.

Langham since January 2006, there has been approximately 15 projects where asbestos was removed on campus.Continue...

Lowering voices to raise money

Journalists for Human Rights (JHR), an organization devoted to increasing awareness about human rights issues and fostering a free press in developing countries, ran its third annual Speak Silence event this weekend. Participants took a vow of silence for 25 hours as a tribute to the 25 million people who have died worldwide as a result of HIV/AIDS.Continue...

Researchers or teachers?

In the Journal ’s second look at issues surrounding the future of undergraduate education, we examine the growing divide between a professor’s research and teaching time, and what that means for the education undergraduate students are receiving.Continue...

Won’t you be my neighbour?

Queen’s first community outreach co-ordinator is surprised the University didn’t have a similar position before “Why isn’t there someone to help you find those resources, someone who already knows where to go so every student doesn’t have to pound the pavement on their own?” she asked.
Linjacki said she hopes to help other students get similarly involved by offering opportunities to interact with each other, the University and the community.Continue...

Common Ground decodes recycling

The Common Ground has become more environmentally friendly with a new recycling program introduced by the AMS Sustainability Coordinator Blake Anderson.

The re-vamp of the Common Ground’s recycling system, which began yesterday, is a three-week pilot project that’s part of a comprehensive waste management initiative to “Stick-it-to-Garbage” in the Queen’s community.Continue...

How to prevent it from happening again

The University has revealed 10 recommendations following a review into the death of Sukaina Mohsin Ali.

Ali, a first-year international student from Pakistan, died of a cardiac arrest in her dorm room in April. She suffered from anorexia nervosa and depression.

Following Ali’s death, Vice-Principal (Academic) Patrick Deane launched a review into the circumstances surrounding her death.Continue...

A soggy anti-poverty protest

A little wind and rain wasn't enough to stop this year's Make Poverty History mission from wrapping Stauffer Library with a white banner more than one kilometre long.

Organized by Jennifer Morden and Kate Ciborowski, both ArtSci '08, of Queen's Make Poverty History chapter, Tuesday's event was one of many that occurred around the world on Oct. 17 in honour of Make Poverty History's annual International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.Continue...

Fastathon raises $500 for AMS foodbank

Students across the Queen’s campus got a taste of what it’s like to go without food on Tuesday, when they participated in a Fastathon from dawn to dusk to raise money for the AMS Foodbank.

The event was organized by the Queen’s University Muslim Students’ Association (QUMSA).Continue...

University sets $130 million target for private, corporate donations

David McCart, manager of strategic initiatives, said of the Queen’s Centre’s $230 million expected budget, $130 million is to come from private fundraising. This includes corporate and individual donations.

McCart said he developed a plan in which for every dollar donated, the University will raise a dollar to match it.Continue...

AMS condemns hate e-mail

Information Technology Services is investigating an e-mail sent anonymously to several Qlink e-mail accounts, villifying Islam as a religion that encourages its followers to “hatred and violence.” The AMS has condemned the letter, which claimed that phrases from the Koran justify Islam’s inherent violence and called on members of all religions to “stand firm against islam [sic] and pray for these evil sinners’ enlightenment.”Continue...

Queen’s Centre excavation to start next year

Several months into construction for the Queen’s Centre, the University is behind in building and working to keep the multi-year, multi-million-dollar project on track.

In order to begin excavating Clergy Street, one of the first steps in the construction of the Queen’s Centre, the Universtity must first purchase the street from the city of Kingston.Continue...

Studying with a ‘hidden’ disability

Few people at the University know there are about 500 students with disabilities enrolled here every year, said Disability Advisor Barbara Roberts. Michael McNeely is one of these people. The ArtSci ’10 has Usher Syndrome, an in herited condition that causes serious early hearing loss and progressive vision loss. McNeely is legally deaf-blind; he can see to a certain extent, although he has trouble adjusting to varying light levels, and he can hear with a cochlear implant he got when he was three years old. McNeely has an intervenor who accompanies him to his classes.Continue...

Why we skip

From growing class sizes to an increasing reliance on technology, the future of undergraduate education is changing.

Economics Professor H. Lorne Carmichael spoke to a sparsely populated lecture hall yesterday morning.

Almost 200 students skipped class, with 136 of the 317 students registered in Econ 110 in attendance at 8:30 a.m.

Carmichael said his students’ background in economics differs, which results in poor attendance.Continue...

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