Archive

‘Club Census’ to record student participation

Starting next month, students will be able to record their extra-curricular involvement on the AMS website and, in the future, print out a non-academic transcript to attach to resumés and graduate school applications.Continue...

News In Brief

Shortly after 4 p.m. last Friday the Queen’s Greens’ began their first Critical Mass Bike Ride.

Approximately 25 cyclists from the Queen’s and Kingston community began their route from the Grey House. Signs and posters about vehicle pollution were attached to student’s bikes. The event’s aim was to have cars yield to cyclists as they ride through the streets of Kingston.Continue...

Anarchist professor to speak at Grad Club

Richard Day never wanted to become a professor.

The assistant sociology professor said he believes that everyone gives up his or her power to choose
apathy. One example of this is working for someone else. “I’m giving away my power … by working at Queen’s,” Day told the Journal . “I’m a ward of the state.”Continue...

Making a career out of compassion

Ever since 1972, when Dr. Jack Preger graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin and ventured to Bangladesh to provide medical assistance to refugees of the Indo-Pakistan War, he has worked tirelessly to help the sick and impoverished in the region. In 1979 he traveled to Kolkata, set up an illegal street clinic, and started the Calcutta Rescue Foundation. Today, the group provides free medical care and education to the poorest people in Kolkata and rural West Bengal.Continue...

Queen’s taps into iTunes

The University is developing a partnership with Apple Computers’ education program, “iTunes U” and that allows the University to post content on a website that can be downloaded to iPods or other mp3s.Continue...

Students content with ‘Zellers education’

If students want a better in-class experience, then universities need more professors or fewer students, said Kim Nossal, head of the political studies department, at Sunday’s Great Debate.

The debate, organized by the AMS advancement and development office, featured Queen’s professors and provincial politicians discussing the state of post-secondary education in Canada.Continue...

The trouble with transfer credits

Students wishing to apply to graduate school who have been on exchange are required to send transcripts from both Queen’s and the partner school they attended.

To obtain their numerical grades, students must contact their partner institution to receive a separate transcript.Continue...

Towards a more accessible campus

When geography professor Audrey Kobayashi returned to Queen’s four years ago after months in the hospital, she got a rude awakening: because she was in a wheelchair, she couldn’t get into many campus buildings, including her own office and many of her classrooms in Mackintosh-Corry Hall. When it came to her lecture hall at room B201 in Mac-Corry, gaining accessibility was a bit more difficult, because it was only accessible from the back.Continue...

Queen’s tries to fill demand for faculty

The University is planning to hire approximately 65 new faculty members this coming year, in order to lessen the pressure on existing faculty brought upon by swelling student numbers and increases in professor retirements.
In May of 2005, the Ontario provincial government announced a $6.2 billion-dollar commitment to fund post-secondary schools over the next five years.Continue...

Kielburger’s crusade to Free the Children

Since 1995, the group of 12-year-olds has grown into an international organization—Free the Children—that has built 450 primary schools in more than 40 countries in an attempt to give every child the opportunity to get an education.Continue...

Universities make more information available

After opting out of the Maclean’s rankings this summer, the University will standardize information about its enrollment, class sizes and other variables for current and prospective students. Queen’s was one of 22 universities to opt out of the Maclean’s annual university survey in August.
Principal Karen Hitchcock said the University will continue to offer a detailed source of information about Queen’s, and students can make their own judgments about the universities based on the information given.Continue...

Preparing for a pandemic

In the event of an influenza pandemic, the University has a planned strategy, which includes providing adequate resources for campus services, prioritizing patients at the health centre, and communicating with students, staff and faculty about how to deal with influenza.Continue...

The key to security on campus

The AMS has about 50 rooms within the JDUC, Macgillivray-Brown Hall and the Grey House, but there’s no “air-tight” way to keep track of who has keys to what. There is also no way to guarantee that individuals are not making copies of their keys before returning them.Continue...

Why your textbooks are so pricey

Wendy Spiegel, spokesperson for Pearson Education, a textbook publisher, said textbook prices vary reatly according to the book and the discipline it covers. “Textbook pricing … [depends] upon what the ultimate deliverable is,” she said. Costs relating to raw materials, intellectual property, art and design ll are factored into a textbook’s price, Spiegel said, and different types of textbooks have very different cost breakdowns.Continue...

News In Brief

The Canadian Press reported that Queen’s alumna Jennifer Headley, 34, was one of 24 people killed in a helicopter crash in eastern Nepal sept. 23.

The helicopter crashed into the side of a mountain about 400 kilometres east of Kathmandu and fell into a ravine. There were no survivors.Continue...

Chemistry omits names to prevent bias

Students are now required to omit their names from chemistry lab books as part of an attempt to prevent bias by professors and TAs when marking assignments. Bob Lemieux, head of the chemistry department, said it’s not a formal written policy within the department, but he has suggested that faculty implement the practice.Continue...

Reinventing the way you’re taught

Leo Jonker is out to change the way Queen’s students learn. Appointed the university’s first chair of teaching and learning in May, Jonker has a budget of $20,000 to develop initiatives meant to help students get more out of their formal education.Continue...

Run For the Cure raises $210,000

The Queen’s rugby team raised about $12,000 for breast cancer research research. The team was among 1,841 participants in the 15th annual Canadian Breast Councer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure.

Korin Flindall, co-director of Kingston’s Run for the Cure, said their preliminary fundraising figure was about $210,000.Continue...

‘Great night for all women’

Kingston women reclaimed the streets Friday night at the 25th annual Take Back the Night rally and march. Despite the chilly weather, more than 50 women and three men met at Confederation Basin to protest violence against women.Continue...

No plans for mental illness week

This week is Mental Illness Awareness week, but the University’s Health, Counselling and Disabilities Services (HCDS) don’t have anything planned because they didn’t know about it. Mike Condra, HCDS Director, added that he will be holding training for members of the AMS Mental Health Awareness Committee on Wednesday, and HCDS will organize more awareness events later this semester.Continue...

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