Archive

Crowded classes cause concern

When English professor robert Morrison is teaching, he likes to know the names of all the students in his class. This year, because of increased class sizes and the popularity of certain courses, such as Morrison’s romantic literature course, that’s just not possible. “I like to know everyone’s names because I think that’s respectful,” Morrison said. “With ninety-three people in a class, I can’t do it.”
Morrison said the classes he’s teaching this year are very full, something he said is becomingmore common.Continue...

Selling Queen’s

Thousands of high school students clog escalators and jostle through halls, their expressions ranging from anxiety to exhilaration to total bemusement. representatives at booths eagerly promote their wares with booklets, pens and T-shirts. No, it’s not a mall, or a major sporting event; it’s the Ontario universities Fair, where 20 post-secondary institutions from around the province set up shop for a weekend to get their message out to high school students.Continue...

$11.5 million for virtual lab

The Ontario government has awarded $11.5 million to the University’s high-performance computing facility.

Announced Friday, the grant comes from the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation and the $550 million Ontario Research Fund. In the next five years, the province will donate a total of $39.2 million to the labs and aid up to 1,600 researchers.Continue...

Historic radio waves resonate on campus

Students walking by the unassuming grey side door of Carruthers Hall may not realize it, but the door with the crackling loudspeaker beside it is home to over eighty years of tradition at Queen’s.

Radio broadcasting at CFRC 101.9FM, located in the basement of Carruthers Hall, has a long history behind it.Continue...

AMS wipes out Swipe program

An all-in-one student debit card and coupon card program was cancelled before students could begin to use it. AMS students would have used the card at local Kingston businesses and all AMS venues.

The program was cancelled in June after a partnership between the AMS and Givex, a Toronto-based company, did not meet AMS needs.Continue...

Two students vie for Sydenham seat

Today is the last day candidates can file their nomination papers for the Nov. 13 municipal election, and there are already three students in the race.

Despite running on similar platforms, Nathaniel Erksine-Smith, ArtSci ’07, and Alex Huntley, ArtSci ’08, have registered to run in the same riding: Sydenham Ward, the area encompassing most of the Ghetto.Continue...

Human Rights Office moves to Mac-Corry

The University’s Human Rights Office has moved, and office staff said they’re concerned with their new location’s privacy and smaller space.

Previously located in the Old Medical Building, the HRO moved to Mac-Corry A-320 on Aug. 8. The Office of Advancement now occupies the old space.Continue...

Lillian Allen’s campus debut

Lillian Allen, Queen’s University’s first ever writer-in-residence, performed to a packed room in Watson Hall on tuesday in the first event associated with her appointment to the position.

Writer-in-residence programs are operated through shared funding between the host university and the Canada Council. Writers are expected to spend 60 per cent of their time on their own work and 40 per cent working with the university and community.Continue...

Facebook not just for students

Vice-Principal (Advancement) George Hood has a Facebook account. So does Associate Dean of Student Affairs Roxy Denniston-Stewart, Campus Security Technical Co-ordinator Steve Gill, and numerous professors.

With recent changes in the privacy levels of Facebook—before only those with a valid school e-mail address could make a profile, now anyone and everyone is welcome—students began to worry that the privacy they associated with Facebook would be eliminated.Continue...

AMS to revamp All-Ages Access

Ian Black, AMS VP (Operations), said last year’s All-Ages Access (AAA) program, which allowed underage students into campus pubs, was a positive but flawed idea. It was suspended indefinitely in December 2005, following 12 infractions since that September.Continue...

All the world’s a shrinking stage

Michael Murphy, ArtSci ’07, Queen’s Musical Theatre (QMT) artistic director, said he’s tired of feeling like a squatter in his own school.

Murphy, who also runs Staged and Confused, a student theatre company that performs in Kingston and Toronto, said the dramatic arts at Queen’s need more space and more money.

This year, Murphy said Staged and Confused won’t be performing in Kingston because of shortages in venues and funding.Continue...

Walking to raise AIDS awareness

Run by HIV/AIDS Regional Services (HARS) Kingston, Kingston’s 15th annual AIDS Walk kicked off at 6:30 p.m. at City Park and led participants along Beverly Street. The event culminated in a lantern festival and fire-dancing performance. Saturday’s walkers varied in age, race and sexual orientation, and included individuals who were infected as well as those who had little previous knowledge.Continue...

‘An indescribable human holocaust ...’

During his time as UN special envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa, Stephen Lewis visited a school in Zimbabwe and heard children talk about their fear of death and their belief in the power of prayer.

Lewis told more than 600 Queen’s and Kingston community members there are 40 million people living with HIV in the world, 30 million of whom are in Africa. He said that three million people die every year as a result of AIDS.Continue...

Graduate students get cash infusion

The University’s graduate studies programs will open up more than 966 new spaces over the next three years.

The exact numbers of how the spaces will be distributed by department aren’t yet finalized, and will depend on the numbers of this year’s graduate population.

The spaces were part of an Ontario government announcement on Thursday that increased graduate student space by 55 per cent.Continue...

Head hunted

Although April may still seem a long way away, preparing for a summer or post-graduation job is already a top priority for many students.

Through events run by Career Services, such as this week’s Career Fair and ongoing information sessions held on campus by employers, students can pursue specific companies, and hope they are pursued in return.Continue...

Queen’s asked to contribute to Homecoming bill

The University has agreed to meet with the Police Services Board after the board announced at a meeting Thursday night that Kingston Police spent $352,740 patrolling the Ghetto and keeping the peace on Homecoming weekend.Continue...

COR canned on West Campus

Amidst the excitement of the first weeks of school on West Campus this September, a regular safety service was missing from the scene.

Residence Life and Health, Counselling and Disability Services made a joint operational decision to close down the Campus Observation Room (COR) West Campus location for 2006-07.

Daryl Nauman, co-director of Residence Life at Queen’s, attributed the decision to a lack of demand at the West Campus location.Continue...

New grey boxes for Ghetto

Starting Oct. 2, your blue box will go out one week, and your grey box will go out the next.

The new grey box is specifically for fibre products, such as newspapers, phone books and catalogues.

Cereal boxes, milk and juice cartons, paper egg cartons and paper towel tubes can also be included, but you need to flatten them, place them inside an untied plastic bag or tie them in bundles.

Blue boxes will still be for other recyclables, such as aluminum cans and plastic containers.Continue...

Advocating for action

Janet Elvidge, head nurse at Queen’s Health, Counseling and Disability Services, said free testing for HIV is available at on campus at the health centre in the LaSalle Building.

John MacTavish, executive director for HIV/AIDS Regional Services (HARS) in Kingston, said the number of HIV infections is on the rise for youth in Ontario and there are a number of reasons why youth are becoming complacent about having safe sex.Continue...

ASUS passes budget in the black

The Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) recovered from 2004-05’s $26,403 loss and posted a $9,358 profit in 2005-06.

Lyndsey Hannigan, last year’s ASUS vice-president and chief financial officer, said when she budgeted last year, she had to be tactful. Hannigan said the society was lucky last year because more students came than they had planned: With a $19.61 student fee, ASUS received more money because more students enrolled at the University.Continue...

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