Archive

Assessing the University’s environmental sustainability

A student group who spent more than two years compiling an assessment of the University’s sustainability still hasn’t found what it’s looking for.

The two co-presidents of Queen’s Sustainability, Charles Liu, ArtSci ’08 and Gareth Chantler, ArtSci ’09, said the report, the third of its kind in Canada, can instigate lasting change by acting as a benchmark against which to compare future data.Continue...

Migrating northward

Despite paying about $15,584.30 for one year’s tuition in an Arts and Science degree, compared with $5,176.30 for domestic students, statistics released from the University have shown a steady increase in American students coming to Queen’s over the past five years.

In 2001, there were 79 Americans in the incoming group of first-year students. In 2002, the number rose to 97 and then to 120 in 2003. The number has since grown from 130 in 2004 to 132 in 2005.Continue...

Case closed on Hitchcock allegations

Principal Karen Hitchcock has been cleared of alleged ethical misconduct from her time at the State University of New York Albany (SUNY).

On May 6, 2006, John Rae, chair of the Board of Trustees, sent a letter to the Board outlining the actions taken by Hitchcock and her team of lawyers and to announce the conclusion of the investigation.Continue...

Volunteers manage to keep street virtually glass-free

They wore red hats and glowstick necklaces. They traded plastic cups for glass bottles. They gave out free popcorn.

Several of them were still on Aberdeen Street early Sunday morning at 5 a.m., cleaning discarded cups and bottles.

All of them played a role in helping smooth relations between party-goers and police.Continue...

Despite larger crowd and 58 arrests, AMS president calls party outcome ‘a first step’

Saturday night’s Aberdeen Street homecoming party drew more than 8,000 people—a larger crowd than last year’s bash when students flipped over a car and set it on fire—but the overall mood was safer and less hostile than 2005.Continue...

Pluto’s change of status proves science can be flexible

Following the demotion of Pluto from its place as the ninth planet in our solar system to being one of several “dwarf planets,” the seemingly universe-shattering decision won’t change astronomy courses very much.
David Hanes, head of the physics department, was a delegate at the conference. He said his astronomy and physics courses won’t change drastically following the decision.Continue...

One person’s trash ...

A campus group will spend this Sunday cleaning up Aberdeen Street with the hope of collecting enough empty beer cans to help build a house in Kingston.

Adam Alexander, ConEd ’08 and co-founder of the Habitat for Humanity Queen’s chapter, hopes to collect as many aluminum cans as possible this year in order to compete in Alcan’s annual aluminum can drive.Continue...

A wet and greasy climb

The class of Sci ’10 spent almost as much time “bringing sexy back” as they did climbing the pole at Saturday’s annual Grease Pole event, which broke for more than two hours after a male student was removed from the pit on a spinal board.
The pit was cleared nearly an hour and a half into the climb as Queen’s First Aid and medical personnel entered to treat the student, who was taken to the hospital for examination.Continue...

Students to be awarded for civic excellence

Patrick Deane, vice-principal (academic), is spearheading the new Civic Responsibility Award, an award created with the intention to recognize students’ significant or outstanding contributions to the community’s well-being.

Three students will be recognized with the award.Continue...

Engineering with a human face

Jamie Miller is developing a new Masters program that will be the first of its kind in Canada. Miller, a Masters student himself, is working to create an environmental engineering program that focuses on projects in developing communities and disaster relief.

Miller, who is developing the project as part of his degree, said he hopes it will encourage students to look at engineering from a different perspective. He said the course will have a multidisciplinary curriculum.Continue...

Pointing out the problems and seeking the solutions

Frances Darwin is the first person to admit that talking alone won’t solve problems.

Instead, the ArtSci ’07 student and director of the September 18 Student Symposium on Queen’s Identity hopes that by facilitating discussion about issues like campus diversity and tuition hikes, the event will push students, faculty and Kingston residents to take action and address problems in their community.Continue...

A summer spent in a war zone

Rula Salam, a second-year English PhD student, found the war at her doorstep. On July 12, when Hezbollah abducted two Israeli soldiers, Salam said it didn’t seem like something that would lead to anything more: Israel has conducted similar prisoner exchanges in the past.

When the news reported that the south was being heavily bombed later that day, she said it was unbelievable. The targeting soon moved much closer to home for Salam and her family when the suburbs of Beirut were bombed.Continue...

Jessica Goldberg recalls hours in a bomb shelter in Haifa

Jessica Goldberg, ConEd ’07, was studying for her final exams at Israel’s University of Haifa when Hezbollah abducted two Israeli soldiers.

During the ensuing clash between the Israeli Defence Force and Hezbollah, the atmosphere in Israel grew tense.Continue...

Campus Liberals split on leadership race

Since Paul Martin’s resignation in March of this year, the Liberal party has been abuzz searching for a new leader. Throughout the summer, 10 candidates have campaigned across Canada, calling on all Liberals to support their quest for leadership.

Responding to some of those calls are members of the Queen’s University Liberal Association (QULA).

With such a large number of candidates, however, the organization is split over whom they should support.Continue...

AMS Homecoming plan takes ‘pragmatic’ approach

The AMS is taking a pragmatic and realistic approach to Homecoming this year, focusing more on safety than prevention. AMS Municipal Affairs Commissioner Ryan Quinlan-Keech and AMS President James Macmillan outlined the initiatives that the AMS has taken to prepare for the weekend.
First aid stations will be set up in the area, as well as a station where all volunteers can congregate to be located in front of 11 Aberdeen St.

Water bottles and plastic cups will also be available at the station.Continue...

Homecoming message found ‘under the kilt’

Five commerce students are using the phrase “under the kilt” for a $9,000 campaign to encourage students to party responsibly during Homecoming.

The group has tried to build the hype around their message by refusing to disclose it.

Instead, they encourage curious students to visit their website, which uses videos, slogans and pictures to convince students to party responsibly during Homecoming 2006.Continue...

News In Brief

Twenty desktop computers purchased by Queen’s were stolen from a computer lab in the basement of Jeffrey Hall on July 9. The total value of the machines was about $27,000.

Campus Security said security cables were cut by the thieves.

The break and enter has forced ITS and Campus Security to reconsider the physical security of its on-campus computer labs.Continue...

Tett tenants want answers about their future

Tenants of a building Queen’s bought for a new art center are now expecting the University to find them a new home.

The Domino Theatre and Stella Buck Centre, the two buildings that make up the J.K. Tett complex, officially became Queen’s property on July 31.

The buildings, located at 370 King St., will be converted into a performing arts centre that will provide classrooms, offices, a concert hall and other facilities for the Schools of Music and Drama and the Art Department.Continue...

Student Scheme greens Ghetto

Kingston’s downtown core received several environmentally friendly facelifts this past summer, and Green Scheme can be thanked for the city’s fresh new glow.

Aislinn McCarry, Green Scheme’s manager, said it’s a long-term community stewardship initiative aimed at fusing community groups and university students through a series of environmentally-friendly activities, such as tree-planting and gardening projects.
Green Scheme was launched in March as a result of a challenge raised in Principal Hitchcock’s letter to students entitled “Aberdeen: Moving Forward.”Continue...

Improvements to NAD in the works

Jenn Mansell, AMS chief prosecutor, and Stephanie Ramsden, AMS internal affairs commissioner, spoke at a special senate meeting Sept. 5 outlining changes made to the AMS non-academic discipline system over the summer.
The objective of the changes, Mansell said, is to improve communication, organization, awareness and accountability.Continue...

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