Archive

Festive Frosh Week

Frosh Week 2006, festive even without traditional house parties, hasn’t been a major cause of concern to police.

Last year, 66 charges were laid against students over the Tuesday and Wednesday of Frosh Week, and the annual Main Campus Residence Council’s (MCRC) dance had to be cancelled an hour and a half early due to underage drinking.

Patrick Hoffman, MCRC VP (social) said that for the MCRC executive this year, safety was a primary concern.Continue...

Wanted: a community-builder

The search is on for a community outreach coordinator, whose role it will be to build a sense of community for students living off campus. Jason Laker, associate vice-principal and dean of student affairs said the new outreach coordinator, who will earn an annual salary of $43,867, will probably organize activities and liaise between the administration and off-campus students.Continue...

Focusing on frosh

In a survey about first-year orientation conducted by the Senate Orientation Activities Review Board (SOARB), 74 per cent of students who participated in 2005 orientation said they were treated equally by their leaders, compared to 64 per cent in 2004. Overall student respect for frosh leaders rose from 52 per cent to 63 per cent. From grease poles to coveralls, each University faculty boasts their own unique set of orientation traditions. Organizers say they value these traditions because of their role in promoting faculty pride.Continue...

Aberdeen to close for Homecoming

Aberdeen Street will be closed Homecoming weekend following a motion passed by Kingston City Council Aug. 22.

The motion was part of an AMS proposal put forward to council with the help of University administration and police.

The three-pronged proposal also advocated an exemption from the noise bylaw for students partying that night but council vetoed this proposal.Continue...

Queen’s drops out of Maclean’s

Queen’s is among at least 22 schools to pull out of Maclean’s magazine’s university ranking issue.

“In recent years, there has been considerable concern in the University community about the methodology used by Maclean’s in their ranking of Canadian universities,” Principal Karen Hitchcock said in a statement released Aug. 23.

Eleven university presidents sent a letter to Tony Keller, Maclean’s special projects managing editor, announcing their intention to withdraw from the survey.

In the letter, sent on Aug. 14, the universities expressed reservations regarding the survey’s methodology.Continue...

Queen’s unveils Homecoming strategy

The administration revealed a new ad campaign aimed to diffuse tensions and try to prevent a repeat of last year’s Homecoming, at a press conference Wednesday.

Newspaper ads and posters around campus with slogans such as “Keep Queen’s reputation out of the gutter” and “It’s not a car, it’s your degree that’s getting trashed,” reference the Queen’s Code of Conduct and potential long-term effects of an unsanctioned street party. The ads are intended to encourage students to think twice before joining in, Patrick Deane, vice-principal (academic) said.Continue...

Residence guests banned next weekend

Students living in residence received an e-mail at the end of August informing them they won’t be allowed to invite his friends to stay in residence over Homecoming weekend.

A Homecoming committee, comprised of residence and hospitality services, the principal’s office, the Main Campus Residents' Council (MCRC) and the Jean-Royce Hall Council, determined the new regulation.Continue...

Volunteers to ‘lend a sense of calm’ in Ghetto

A University alumnus is putting out a call for volunteers to walk the Ghetto on Homecoming weekend and act as a buffer between police and partying students.

Vinni Rebelo, a Kingston entrepreneur and manager of the Ambassador Hotel, said the idea came to him following last year’s unsanctioned street party, when more than 5,000 people crowded onto Aberdeen Street, and a car was flipped and set on fire.Continue...

Evaluating student aid

The cancelling of the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation, set to distribute the last of its endowment in 2009, is one of the four threats to student aid listed in a recent study that suggests Canada may be looking at financial aid the wrong way. Established in 1998 by the federal government, the foundation was mandated to only continue until 2009. Their grant program targets lowincome families and is based on different criteria than the original need-based grants.Continue...

Cooking up a storm in residence

I remember the look on my mom’s face when she caught me inhaling a freshly cooked pot of Kraft Dinner shortly after I had come home from first year. Yes, I had been eating unhealthier than normal. It had become instinctual to reach for something that didn’t burn a hole in my pocket, was effortless to make and even easier to eat after adapting to the residence way of life for the previous eight months.Continue...

Some students want smaller police presence for Homecoming 2006

About 45 per cent of respondents to a police survey of students in the Ghetto advocated less of a police response to Homecoming.

Police Chief Bill Closs said it makes sense for students to want less police presence.
This won’t necessarily result in having fewer police patrolling the area, however.Continue...

Queen’s buys Tett complex to house performing arts

The musicians, dancers and artists of Queen’s will soon have a performance space to call their own, after city council approved the sale of part of the J.K. Tett complex to the University. On Tuesday night, all council members except Rick Downes voted to sell the Stella Buck Building and the Domino Theatre to the University. The City will retain ownership of the J.K Tett centre, the third building in the complex.Continue...

Homecoming recommendations passed at city council meeting

Kingston's City Council passes all 17 recommendations made by the Committee for the Safe and Legal Use of Public and Private Space at last Tuesday’s council meeting. Last year, about 5,000 people partied on Aberdeen Street during Homecoming weekend and a car was overturned and set on fire.Continue...

University investigates student death

The University is conducting an investigation into Sukaina Mohsin Ali’s death.

The first-year international student from Pakistan died of cardiac arrest in her dorm room on April 10.

Patrick Deane, vice-principal (academic), said the investigation is meant to better inform Ali’s family and the Queen’s community about the circumstances surrounding Ali’s death. Deane said the date for the release of the investigation’s results has not yet been determined.Continue...

How you got here

Here’s what happens between the time you submit your application to Queen’s and receive your offer of admission. Or don’t receive an offer of admission. Jo-Anne Brady, University registrar, said the University had 25,487 applications for 3,217 undergraduate direct entrance spaces for this coming year.Continue...

Surveillance cameras could put a spotlight on Aberdeen

The Committee for the Safe and Legal Use of Public and Private Space recommends surveillance cameras on Aberdeen Street. The camera recommendation was one of 17 the Committee submitted to city council on July 18. All recommendations were passed by council. Cameras will be mounted—most likely on utility poles—and set up prior to any illegal activity taking place.Continue...

Welcome to construction

This year, all undergraduate students will pay $71.50 to help the University construct a $230 million student centre, arena, track, gymnasium, pool and a new Faculty of Physical and Health Education building. With construction delayed until next spring, it is likely that current students will only get to see the new buildings when they return for Homecoming.Continue...

‘Healthy’ sales mean Starbucks here to stay

After a trial period resulting in “healthy” sales, the University will continue to brew Starbucks coffee.

But a wide range of feedback from the trial period makes the case for a University-wide corporate ethics policy, said Bruce Griffiths, director of residence and hospitality services.Continue...

‘Significant gifts’ withdrawn after Aberdeen

The unsanctioned Aberdeen street party during Homecoming 2005 has prompted some alumni to decrease their contributions to the University, says Dan Rees, Comm ’92 and ArtSci ’93, and chair of the Queen’s University Alumni Association.Continue...

Greenroom, Tricolour to swap locations

The Greenroom and Tricolour Market will swap locations this summer primarily because Tricolour Market needs to move to a more central location so it wouldn’t lose so much money, say Ian Black, AMS V-P (operations).Continue...

Pages