Archive

Captain Kirk leaves for NHL

Kirk Muller is leaving his position as head coach of the Golden Gaels hockey team for greener, more high-profile pastures.

The former NHLer is returning to the Montreal Canadiens, the team with which he won the Stanley Cup in 1993, as an assistant coach.Continue...

Deakin cancels Frosh parties

A frosh leader can no longer host his or her traditional parties for first-year students during Frosh Week after a decision made by Janice Deakin, outgoing dean of student affairs.Continue...

‘On the front lines’ in residence

The April 2006 death of Sukaina Mohsin Ali and the October 2003 death of Liz Tremblay, both
first-year students in residence, have highlighted the potential for unforeseen crises that dons
may face.Continue...

Searching for solutions to Aberdeen

From changing provincial liquor laws to sending letters home to students’ parents, the Committee for the Safe and Legal Use of Public and Private Space has plenty of ideas on how to save Homecoming and town-gown relations.

The committee has met periodically since November to address issues arising from Homecoming 2005. It will present its final recommendations to city council in July.Continue...

News In Brief

At their May 27 meeting, the AMS Board of Directors in favour of switching the locations of the Greenroom and the Tricolour Market. The Greenroom will sell academic supplies and the Tricolour Market will sell retail items and gifts in the upcoming year.Continue...

Friends question international student support

Three friends of Sukaina Mohsin Ali said she suffered from diarrhea and headaches in the week leading up to her death on April 10, but that the international student from Pakistan didn’t see a doctor because she thought she would have to pay for the service.Continue...

Community’s ‘tolerance has run out’

Street parties by Aberdeen residents generate dissent amongst community members. It’s that attitude from some Aberdeen residents that has Vice-Principal (Academic) Patrick Deane concerned. Deane told the Journal that the reaction following an Aberdeen Street party on April 30 is a sign that the Kingston community has lost its patience with students.Continue...

Students must dig deeper

Queen’s students will face an average 3.6 per cent tuition increase for the next two years, following the approval of tuition changes at a Board of Trustees meeting May 6, 2006.Continue...

Family sent letter to University warning of prior health issues

Sukaina Mohsin Ali, who died in her residence room on West Campus on April 10, struggled with an eating disorder and depression before she left Karachi, Pakistan to come to Queen’s. Both Ali’s uncle and her cousin said that at the time of Ali’s admission to the University, her family in Karachi sent the University a letter from Ali’s psychiatrist informing the admission office of the first-year student’s struggle with anorexia.Continue...

Ali’s enthusiasm and generosity remembered

Students, staff and faculty to remember Ali, the first-year Pakistani student who died in her residence room on April 10. Ali’s friends remembered her as a strong, outgoing and caring individual.Continue...

NAD safe, for now

Non-academic discipline will remain in students’ hands—at least until Nov. 30.

The motion by seven deans to revoke the student-run system and place its judicial power into the hands of the Principal’s office was tabled after Senate unanimously passed a motion made by Dean of Arts and Science Robert Silverman at the May 24 Senate meeting to shelve the motion until the Nov. 30 Senate meeting.Continue...

$190,000 approved for accessibility plans

Students with disabilities could soon be seeing some changes that aim to improve their Queen’s experience.

In a meeting on Monday, the Board of Directors approved the expenditure of up to $190,000 on projects suggested by Accessibility Queen’s. The money for the projects comes from the Accessibility Fund, a restricted fund whose balance from annual student fees accumulates from one year to the next.Continue...

University proposes performing arts complex

If the City of Kingston agrees to a recent proposal made by the University, the School of Music could have a facility its faculty members say it’s needed for 70 years: a concert hall.

More than 150 community members gathered in City Hall Monday evening to hear the University’s proposal for the J.K. Tett Creativity Centre. It is one of three proposals for the space being considered by the City of Kingston which is seeking to sell the property.Continue...

Community relations projects receive funding

Thanks to $13,600 in funds from the University, four groups of students are gearing up to improve student-community relations. A radio documentary, a student symposium, Ghetto landscaping and publicizing student pride are all on the agenda.Continue...

A look back at ‘crack the clique’

"We had concerns about the referendum versus the AGM process, and those were genuine concerns. But by the time we got into office, you have to realize, the AMS had been heading down this path for two years, so us coming in and saying ‘Nope, we’re not going to do this, we’re going to work against the AGM process,’ would be like a car going 180 mph towards a brick wall and slamming on the brakes three feet before you hit the wall."Continue...

Tricolour awarded to spirited students

Passion for social issues, student leadership and diplomacy have landed three more students in the Tricolour Society.

Jennifer Holub, ArtSci ’06, Ahmed Kayssi, Meds ’09, and Dave Thomas, PhD ’06, have been recognized for their distinguished service to the University as this year’s recipients of the Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award.Continue...

New department, role for Student Patrol

Campus Security’s Student Patrol staff may find themselves working fewer shifts, in different uniforms and under a new name next year, depending on regulations arising from the recently passed Bill 159.

On March 23, Campus Security Director David Patterson met with all Student Patrol staff, emergency response operators and supervisors to inform them of changes that may arise due to the provincial bill which was passed on Dec. 15 2005.Continue...

AMS services will post loss overall

In a year during which the AMS revamped and reincarnated several of its services, the books reflected the financial downswing: altogether, the services are predicted to post a net loss of $30,000 to $40,000 for the year.
One of the year’s biggest success stories, however, is a somewhat new service: Destinations, which took over the sale of Tricolour bus and event tickets from the former UBS, currently stands to gain $10,000 more than had been projected.Continue...

JComm tri-pub ban ruled unfair

Citing unfair treatment by the AMS Judicial Committee (JComm), the University Student Appeal Board (USAB) has overturned a tri-pub ban imposed on Kelsea Fitzpatrick, ArtSci ’09, in late November.

Fitzpatrick, who had originally received the ban for violating the All Ages Access (AAA) program when she did not retrieve her student card from StuCons at Alfie’s, said she was ecstatic about the appeal board’s decision.Continue...

MCRC loans under scrutiny

After a short internal investigation into a $5,000 loan granted by the Main Campus Residents’ Council executive board to its outgoing president, concerns have been raised about whether student money should be used for personal loans to MCRC staff.Continue...

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