Archive

Anti-poverty group hosts

If Kingston and the Islands MPP John Gerretsen had looked out his kitchen window on Friday, Mar. 10, he would have seen some uninvited guests.

The Kingston Coalition Against Poverty (KCAP) hosted a “Have-Not Hoedown” on Gerretsen’s front lawn in anticipation of the upcoming release of the Ontario provincial budget.

KCAP is lobbying Gerretsen to raise social assistance rates by 40 per cent, effectively restoring them to 1995 levels.Continue...

Photos capture human experience of AIDS

Behind all of the devastating statistics on HIV/AIDS, there are unique human experiences.

This is the concept behind “AIDS: Picture Change,” an exhibition of photographs depicting both the struggle and the hope of those in five developing countries battling the deadly disease.

The exhibit—which is traveling to universities and high schools throughout Canada—came to Queen’s Wednesday and Thursday in various locations, on campus.Continue...

AMS releases discipline review at AGM

Following a five-month “thorough and complex review” of the Queen’s non-academic discipline system, the AMS released its report and recommendations on the system at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) Tuesday night.Continue...

PHESA elects new exec

Yesterday evening, the Physical and Health Education Student Association (PHESA) announced Hailey Banack and Dean Vlahaki, both PhysEd ’07 as their new co-presidents, after a two-day election period, held on Wednesday and Thursday.

Katie MacKay, PhysEd ’07 and the internal affairs director, said the voter turnout was just above 50 per cent—relatively high for their small faculty of approximately 400 students.Continue...

University pays Hitchcock lawyer $20,000

The Board of Trustees has approved the payment of $20,000 USD to Robert Fiske, a high-profile New York City lawyer hired by the University to attempt to clear Principal Karen Hitchcock’s name.

Fiske is asking the New York State government to launch an investigation into allegations of ethical misconduct by Hitchcock during her time as president of State University of New York (SUNY), Albany.Continue...

MacLean named next dean of Arts and Science

After searching across the globe to find someone to fill outgoing Dean Robert Silverman’s shoes, the University has appointed someone from close to home as the next dean of Arts and Science.

Alistair MacLean, the current vice-dean of Arts and Science will begin his role as dean of the University’s largest faculty starting in July 2006.Continue...

Ban Righ breakfast service under review

Students living in Waldron Tower may have to walk a bit further for their bacon and eggs next year, as the University is currently contemplating closing Ban Righ cafeteria for breakfast. Leonard cafeteria will continue to serve morning meals, but student and staff response to the plan has still been generally negative.

Alexis Meyerman, Main Campus Residents’ Society (MCRS) president, said the potential closure is a cost-cutting measure.Continue...

Artwork sparks censorship accusations

A pencil and felt pen drawing of a black panther that was on display in the Common Ground set off a firestorm of e-mails earlier this week. Following apologies, one student says she still feels slighted.

The untitled, anonymous piece of art, which featured the panther on a background of math equations, was part of the Committee Against Racial and Ethnic Discrimination’s (CARED) “Art in Colour” event, which brought together works produced by several student artists who self-identify as visible minorities.Continue...

New safety bill could affect StuCons, Walkhome

University students responsible for keeping the peace may soon need to take a few more steps before they can do their jobs.

A new provincial bill, the Private Security and Investigative Services Act 2005, will mandate that all paid security employees complete additional training and an exam before becoming certified to work. Once passed, the bill will affect two AMS services.Continue...

Students drum to protest ‘debt sentence’

Stauffer Library was noisier than usual on Tuesday afternoon, as students sounded off in protest against the province’s recent decision to allow universities to increase tuition.

Banging drums and loudly chanting phrases like “Education under attack! What do we do? Stand up, fight back,” 40 students gathered outside the library to voice their opposition to the tuition proposal released last week.Continue...

Chopping locks for charity

The Lower Ceilidh of the JDUC was transformed into a cross between a makeshift salon and a live stage show on Wednesday as throngs of students gathered to see their peers shear off their hair to help cancer patients. The fifth annual Cuts for Cancer event was, to date, the most successful in Queen’s history, said Sadia Khandaker, the campaign’s public relations director. The event raised $34,313 for the Canadian Cancer Society.Continue...

McNeill to get face lift in summer 2007

What some call a long overdue redevelopment plan for campus residences—most of which have not seen renovations for over 40 years—was approved by the Board of Trustees last Friday.

Roxy Denniston-Stewart, associate dean of student affairs, said a development committee has been working with a hired firm to plan the renovations since July 2004.Continue...

Students kiss and tell for survey

According to a Canadian website devoted to student dating, a “technological sexual revolution” is upon us. Instead of the “free love,” that characterized their parents’ generation, students are opting for a more modernized route—sex of the cyber kind.

Aiming to explore student views on issues related to sex, dating website CampusKiss.com recently conducted a survey that received 2,484 responses from students from universities and colleges across Canada.Continue...

ComSoc elects new executive

As the end of the year approaches, Krista Hapke, Comm ’06, is preparing to hand over her Commerce Society (ComSoc) presidential position to Julia Takach, Comm ’07.

ComSoc’s online voting period ended on Feb. 16.

Hapke told the Journal voter turnout was between 30 and 35 per cent, adding that a possible explanation for the relatively low turnout was that the voting took place during Commerce midterm week.Continue...

Law students tops at national moot

This Valentine’s Day, Andréa Amaral-LeBlanc spent 28 consecutive hours working on factums with teammates Patricia McLean, Navroop Bhandal, Tim Huyer and Colin Yao, all Law ’07. On Feb. 14, the team produced two 50-page factums as they prepared for the National Securities and Corporate Law Moot—a mock court of appeal—in which teams must argue both sides of a fictitious case to the Supreme Court.Continue...

International students still waiting for work off campus

Most international students aren’t as lucky as Daniel Ogutu-were when it comes to finding work.

Under current government guidelines, international students can’t work off-campus. However, changes to these policies may see students working off-campus as early as this summer.

Justin Kerr, international student advisor (short-term programs) at the Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC), said most students don’t have it so easy.Continue...

News In Brief

At approximately 2:50 p.m. on March 2, a female student was assaulted while walking on campus near the Campus Bookstore. According to an alert posted by Campus Security, the student was grabbed by a male assailant and pushed to the ground. The student was able to break free from his grasp and ran to a residence building without being followed.Continue...

Development studies program growing

The development studies department at Queen’s will be going through some development of its own next year, adding new courses and program offerings in September 2006.

Development studies, which examines economic, political and social aspects of development in Canada and abroad, will start offering the program as a major starting in September 2006, due to student demand. It was initially introduced as a medial and minor in 1997.Continue...

New AMS council ready to ‘make it happen’

Team MBT continued to “make it happen” this past weekend when they announced the council members who will staff next year’s AMS.

The AMS council consists of five commissioners and three directors who operate different aspects of the AMS’s student services.

James Macmillan, AMS president-elect, said hiring council members was challenging.Continue...

Alumnus released from Libyan prison

Eight long years without daughters or wife, years inside the impenetrable walls of Abu Salim prison in Libya, are finally over for a Queen’s graduate who was incarcerated for allegedly sympathizing with a group that promoted Libyan democratic reform.
Through those seemingly endless years, Ali Sadegh Elhouni would have had no idea that one man thousands of kilometres away—a man tied to him only through their alma mater—was lobbying night and day for his releaseContinue...

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