Archive

Rankings don’t need school input

This week, Maclean’s magazine released their 17th annual list of university rankings in terms of overall academic success.

It was the first edition of the rankings published after 22 universities dropped out of Maclean’s survey last year. Previously, the rankings relied heavily on information the universities gave the magazine.Continue...

AMS services exempt from fee renewal

Under a new AMS student fee policy, AMS corporate services will no longer have to renew their fees.

The policy has been in discussion for several years by AMS executives and student managers.

The idea of allowing corporate services to be exempt from the triennial review came up because these services are considered essential to the entire student body, said Greg McKellar AMS information officer.Continue...

Offering a refuge for education

In December 2003, Agot Thon boarded a flight from Nairobi Airport to London, and on to Toronto. She flew into Kingston the next morning.

Two years after graduating from high school, Thon left the Kakuma Refugee Camp in northern Kenya to enroll at Queen’s in the Faculty of Nursing in 2004 through the Student Refugee Program.

Thon left her birthplace, Sudan, in 1986 at the age of five to live in Itang refugee camp in Ethiopia for six years. She moved to Kenya’s Kakuma Refugee Camp in 1993.Continue...

Paying the price for loans

Matt Dylag sees a bite taken out of his bank account every month when interest on his line of credit is deducted it.

The third year law student is using both the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) and a student line of credit to fund his education.

He said he took out a line of credit from RBC Royal Bank when he began his second year in the program.Continue...

Uneasy bedfellows

Mike Wheeler says he can appreciate the benefits of having a university in Kingston.

He said the academic environment compliments the growth of industry in the city.

Wheeler, a retired Alcan employee and chair of the Sydenham Ward Tenants and Ratepayers Association, said he saw the mixing of the intellectual community with the city at large on a regular basis. But Wheeler also sees some inherent problems, including the expansion of the student housing area. He said expansion of the University campus may help with space issues in the short term, especially lack of parking, but it won’t solve the lack of space.Continue...

Special fees dent student wallets

As the cost for attending university constantly increases, tuition fees aren’t the only factor responsible for the rise. The growing trend among Canadian universities is the annual increase of Student Activity Fees (SAF), which are called Special Fees at Queen’s.

The student activity fee is the money paid by students for campus clubs and serivces. Queen’s has seen a 61 per cent increase in activity fees in the past 10 years and currently charges $676.68 a year. While many of these fees are subject to opt-out, $419.28 of the fee qualifies as mandatory.Continue...

CFRC fee increase fails, budgets $25K loss

This year’s fall referendum was marked by one of the highest voter turnouts for a referendum without an accompanying executive or rector election in AMS history.

Over both voting days, 4,351 students—32.3 per cent of the undergraduate student population—cast their ballots on questions of fee raises and renewals and four plebiscite questions.

Chief Returning Officer Joanna Adams said she attributes the dramatic rise in voter turnout to a stronger promotional campaign than the Commission of Internal Affairs (CIA) ran in previous years.Continue...

University considers ethics of outfitting

The University still isn’t sure it wants to sign onto a program ensuring its suppliers follow ethical labour practices. But students advocating for ethical purchasing policies hope a recent conference and continued dialogue will convince the administration more needs to be done.

The University held a conference evaluating the implementation of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) at Canadian universities Nov. 2.Continue...

News In Brief

Former Queen’s Technology Manager David Ditchfield was found guilty on Wednesday, Nov. 7 of luring a teenage girl online and trying to escape custody, the Kingston Whig-Standard reported yesterday.Continue...

Martial law silences families

For Ali Shaikh, the events in Pakistan this week are close to home.

Shaikh, Sci ’10, lived in Pakistan until three years ago, when his family moved to Canada for better employment and education opportunities.

Last Saturday, General Pervez Musharraf imposed martial rule on the country, where much of Shaikh’s family still resides.Continue...

Serving his country at home and abroad

On the shores of Italy’s Moro River in 1943, battles raged between Canadian forces and German troops, fighting for control of the Ortona stronghold. John Ross Matheson, ArtSci ’40, was there on temporary assignment when a shell went off directly over his head, sending slivers of steel deep into his brain, six of which remain there today.

Despite what most people would consider a major setback, Matheson didn’t let a literal hole in his head slow him down. After the war and a long recovery, Matheson got married, became a father of six, went to law school, got involved in politics and served as a judge in Ontario’s court system.Continue...

AMS fall referendum statements

The Journal provides this free space for parties on the fall referendum ballot. All statements are unedited.Continue...

News in Brief

Unforeseen complications with working site conditions mean the intersection of University Avenue and Union Street won’t be open until the end of November.

According to the construction update website, the tentative completion date to allow for vehicular traffic on University Avenue was Oct. 31.Continue...

Liaison office to open in Shanghai

Next week, Queen’s will open its China-Queen’s liaison office—a first for Canadian institutions.

John Dixon, associate vice-principal (academic and international) is in Shanghai for the office’s official opening Nov. 5.Continue...

New Stauffer webcam monitors construction

A new webcam has been installed on the top of Stauffer Library overlooking the revitalization project of University Avenue. The camera provides a live feed of the construction and its images are readily accessible on the Queen’s website 24 hours a day.Continue...

AMS puts code, review to plebiscite

The AMS executive hopes to gauge student opinion on several clauses in the draft code of conduct with two plebiscite questions on next week’s referendum ballot.Continue...

The AIDS beat

Like most journalists, the Globe and Mail’s African correspondent Stephanie Nolen used to have a policy of not giving her sources money. “You don’t want to buy a story and you don’t want to warp the situation you’re reporting on,” she told the Journal in a telephone interview from her home in Johannesburg. “There’s often logistical problems, there’s a safety issue. … You just can’t do it.” That policy changed one day in late 2005 in a tiny village in Swaziland. Nolen was travelling with Siphiwe Hlophe, an HIV-positive woman who started the support network Swaziland Positive Living in 2001.Continue...

News In Brief

The case of the sexual assault that occurred during Homecoming 2006 has been closed following the victim’s wishes to settle the matter out of court, said Sergeant Balwant Dhillon, head of the Kingston Police sexual assault unit.

Dhillon couldn’t disclose any specific information regarding the sexual assault, but said the suspect in the case was a 20 year-old male Kingston resident.Continue...

Low grade for sustainability

Queen’s received an overall grade of C in a report comparing sustainability practices at 200 North American universities.

The College Sustainability Report Card 2008, released last Wednesday, was conducted by the Sustainable Endowments Institute, a non-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

It evaluated schools based on eight categories.Continue...

Places to avoid tomorrow night

The Prince George Hotel—today home to the Tir Nan Og, the Old Speckled Hen and Monte’s Lounge—was once owned by, and home to, the Herchmer family. Lily, the daughter of the family, was in love with a rum-runner during the days of prohibition. He was often at sea, said Claudine Santos-Smith, a manager at the Tir Nan Og.Continue...

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