Archive

Ad campaign ‘didn’t seem helpful’

The University is concerned about Homecoming getting out of hand this year but doesn’t think measures such as an extensive awareness campaign are necessary, said Vice-Principal (Academic) Patrick Deane. Last year’s ad campaign featured advertisements telling students, “It’s not a car, it’s your degree that’s getting trashed,” and other similar messages.Continue...

Applied Science may lose donors

Several alumni have threatened to withhold their annual donations to Queen’s due to Clark Hall Pub’s closure, and many more are calling the Faculty of Applied Science to complain. Rob Crabtree, former Engineering Society president and Sci ’90, said the closure isn’t going to influence his decision on whether or not to donate.

Crabtree said alumni are upset because they weren’t given details about Clark’s closure. Alumni donors were forwarded a copy of the e-mail from EngSoc to engineering students about Clark’s closure.Continue...

Clark Hall Pub hosts one-time Ritual

For one afternoon only, engineering students and alumni will be able to return to Clark Hall Pub the Friday of Homecoming weekend. The pub, including the patio, will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Homecoming Friday only.

Because the pub is still technically closed and therefore without staff, security services or use of the University’s liquor licence, the event will be catered by The Harbour, the Kingston-based company that catered Science Formal last year and will cater the event again this year.Continue...

AMS budgets for another loss in operating fund

The AMS may need to increase its annual student fee if it wants to stop running a loss, said Vice-President (Operations) John Manning.

The AMS’ funding hasn’t kept up with its growth over the past couple years, Manning said, resulting in shortfalls like this year’s projected $108,627 loss in the operating fund. This is the second year in a row that fund has posted a loss of more than $100,000.Continue...

Referendum ads ‘a hip way of telling the public nothing’

Ask most people on campus about the upcoming referendum question and you will often get blank stares and maybe an awkward shrug.

Understandably, this may be the response of a demographic with historically lower voter turnout. But young people are not the only ones who are unaware. Other citizens, from all walks of life, don’t know the impending question, which appears to be the result of an information drought and not simply negligence.Continue...

Closure rests on city council debate

The contents of councillor Bill Glover’s mailbox Monday morning will determine whether or not he will vote in favour of closing Aberdeen Street for the Saturday of Homecoming.

The AMS and the University applied for the street closure two months ago.

Glover, councillor for Sydenham ward, which includes the infamous stretch of the Ghetto, said he is waiting on a letter from Principal Karen Hitchcock before deciding whether or not to endorse the closure.Continue...

Volunteers may steer clear of Aberdeen

If city council doesn’t agree to close Aberdeen Street over Homecoming Weekend, last year’s Aberdeen Street volunteers may not be making a repeat appearance. After the Homecoming 2005 Aberdeen Street party made national news, Rebelo was fed up with the reputation Queen’s had acquired and wanted to clean up the notorious annual street party on Aberdeen.Continue...

Education bang for your buck

Parties vying for first spot in the provincial election should rethink the way the Ontario government funds post-secondary institutions, said a spokesperson for the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS).

The CFS wants the government to roll back tuition fees to their 2004-05 levels and double the number of grants available to students.Continue...

A new way to vote

The last time Ontario voters faced a referendum, the year was 1924 and the issue at hand was prohibition. On Oct. 10, 2007, the stakes are a bit higher. At polling stations across the province, voters will be handed two ballots. The first should be a familiar one: it will ask voters to choose from a selection of candidates representing different parties, whom they want to represent them at the provincial level. The second ballot will pose a question with a more lasting impact.Continue...

100-plus Take Back the Night

Women and children literally took to the streets last Thursday to show their support for Take Back the Night. The event, which runs in cities across Canada, the U.S. and Europe on the last Thursday of every September, was organized locally by the Sexual Assault Centre Kingston (SACK). Before the march, participants rallied in Confederation Basin Park, where SACK’s Public Education Coordinator Heather Lackner shared statistics about sexual and physical violence done to women and children.Continue...

Electrical engineering loses $250,000 in cuts

The Faculty of Applied Science is encouraging faculty from the electrical and computer engineering department to leave voluntarily with financial compensation.

The program was announced at the faculty board on Sept. 19. Dean of Applied Science Kimberly Woodhouse wouldn’t comment on the program or how it will work.Continue...

Police suggest more Ghetto patrols all year

After a particularly rowdy September, Insp. Brian Cookman said Kingston Police may have to look into adding additional officers to patrol the Ghetto all year.

The Kingston Whig-Standard quoted police Chief Bill Closs suggesting the Ghetto might need up to 16 officers to patrol it all day, every day of the year.Continue...

Talking property standards with the housing minister

John Gerretsen, MPP for Kingston and the Islands and minister of municipal affairs and housing, said the province has given Ontario municipalities everything they need to improve the housing situation in places like the Queen’s student Ghetto.Continue...

Preserving pieces of the past

The ink has faded in some areas, the paper looks a little uneven—especially on the edges—and it comes with the original seal, restored from its shattered state. The document that predates me by more than a century established Queen’s as a college to instruct students in “the various branches of Science Literature” in the Province of Upper Canada.Continue...

Peer counselling in the works

Starting in early November, long lines at Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) will no longer keep students from getting counselling.

The AMS-run Peer Support Centre will offer support and guidance in non-academic areas of student life.

The centre will be based on the second floor of the JDUC in room 214 and students will be able to drop in, call or e-mail to set up an appointment.Continue...

‘No flexibility’ in budget

In the first week of July, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science Kimberly Woodhouse was told her faculty was going to have to make cuts to its budget.

Associate Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science Lynann Clapham said the budget was finalized in the fourth week of August, resulting in a $200,000 cut. Clapham said the faculty heads were not made aware of the budget cuts until the end of August.Continue...

Powwow to promote education, community

On Saturday Agnes Benedickson Field will be host to Queen’s first annual educational powwow, “Engaging the Community.”

Georgina Riel, Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre manager, said she expects anywhere between 1,000 and 5,000 attendees.

The powwow is the first at Queen’s and is hosted by Four Directions, the campus resource centre for aboriginal community members or anyone interested in aboriginal issues and practices.Continue...

AMS unsure if Aberdeen Street to close

The AMS is sticking to last year’s game plan when preparing for Homecoming 2007, said President Kingsley Chak.

“The city and the AMS and the administration are working very closely together,” he said. “The main goal for us is to maintain public safety. The police and us have been talking to see how we can achieve that goal together.”

Chak said the AMS’s general approach to Homecoming will be the same, and they will continue to work with the city and the Kingston police.Continue...

Community outreach centre unveiled in Ghetto

Students living on Aberdeen Street welcomed a new neighbour yesterday as Queen’s unveiled its new community outreach centre—the first of its kind in Canada, Jason Laker, dean of student affairs, said.

The centre, located at 11 Aberdeen St., was Laker’s brainchild and is mandated to “offer increased opportunities for student involvement, broader awareness of Queen’s University services and offers greater connections between the Queen’s community and the local Kingston and area communities.”Continue...

Campus initiatives target low voter turnout

Almost two weeks into the provincial election, the AMS and Elections Ontario’s Kingston and the Islands office are teaming up to raise awareness about the upcoming provincial election on campus.

Elections Ontario had voter registration booths set up in the residence cafeterias—Ban Righ Hall, Leonard Hall, and Jean Royce Hall—on September 12, 13, 17 and 18.Continue...

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