Archive

Cheerleading posters ‘not respectful of women’

Queen’s Bands has issued a letter of apology following the distribution of flyers that drew complaints of sexism.

“There were three [flyers] advertising tryouts for Queen’s Bands, specifically the cheerleading section of it,” said AMS Social Issues Commissioner Jeff Brown. “The content of them included one saying ‘Hotties wanted,’ and others had a cheerleading throw that was sexually suggestive that said, ‘Do you like this spread?’”Continue...

University unveils new $400,000 urgent-care clinic

Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) started the school year with a new $400,000 urgent-care clinic.

This summer, the interior of the HCDS building, located in the La Salle Building at 146 Stuart St., was renovated to revamp its examination rooms.

While the renovations, which began in the third week of May, took place, the HCDS ran under regular hours.Continue...

More than just Cowtown

Jared McVeen, Sci ’06, is the first to admit he’s a terrible cook. Fortunately the new Calgary resident can afford to enjoy restaurant meals on a daily basis, thanks to the substantial salary he earns working in the booming western Canadian economy.Continue...

Detours don’t hinder class commute

First thing Monday morning, students were faced with the reality of a campus under construction as they headed back to class.

Just after 8:30 a.m. students were still trying to pick a route to class, many with maps downloaded from the University’s website in hand.

Inside, Stauffer Library shook with the construction, and the noise took away the calm of the library setting.Continue...

Free Toronto Star program cancelled at Queen’s

The Toronto Star has cancelled its Campus Readership Program with Queen’s University due to lack of sponsorship.

JDUC Director Robert Burge said the newspaper contacted Queen’s about two months ago. He received an e-mail saying the program would be ending at the end of August if the newspaper didn’t find another sponsor.Continue...

Greenovations to spruce up Ghetto houses

The AMS Sustainability Office is teaming up with Destinations and the Living Energy Lab to help promote sustainable housing throughout the student ghetto through a new Greenovations project.

The Living Energy Lab is a project run by the Faculty of Applied Science that retrofits student houses, turning them into living laboratories for studying energy conservation.

Destinations will donate one per cent of the cost of each ticket on Tricolour Express, the student-run discount bus service, sold to the Sustainability Office in a lump sum—approximately $6,000 to $7,000, based on last year’s figures.Continue...

Grease Pole climb ‘amazing’

The class of Sci ’11 was treated to sunshine, muddy water and copious amounts of lanolin at Saturday’s annual Grease Pole climb.

Scott Irwin, Sci ’11, victoriously grabbed the tam from the top of the lanolin-covered Pole after exactly 1 hour, 47 minutes and 31 seconds of struggling.Continue...

Construction roadblock to campus accessibility

For PhD student Margaret Bedore, the inconvenience of campus construction brings with it additional hardships.

Bedore, 61, suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic autoimmune disease that stiffens her joints and makes movement more laborious for her.

Because of her arthritis, she walks with a slight limp that makes it very easy for her to trip on uneven streets and sidewalks that are common on a campus under construction.Continue...

Ian Van Toch was a ‘genuine guy’

Ian Van Toch will be remembered for his effusive warmth and infectious laughter, says his friend and fellow Queen’s student Alex Caspary. Caspary was with Van Toch before he died of heart failure in his Toronto apartment on Aug. 24. It was later determined that the 22-year-old had been living with coronary heart disease.Continue...

Volunteers relieve construction chaos on move-in day

Move-in day in residence was no more hectic than usual this year despite thousands of first-years and their parents negotiating a campus under construction. The group of arrivals was lessened by about one third, however, because Residence Life waived early arrival fees, allowing frosh to move in earlier.Continue...

Queen’s to apply for four separate liquor licences

Beginning late this fall, campus pubs likely won’t have to worry about being shut down because of the indiscretions of other establishments. Bruce Griffiths, director of residence and hospitality services, in conjunction with the University administration, has decided to apply for four separate liquor licences.

Currently, Queen’s holds one liquor license, allowing all three campus pubs and The Grad Club to operate under it. The University has entered into an agreement with each establishment, requiring they adhere to Queen’s policy, to the stipulations of the licence and to the law.Continue...

Student Constables to supervise Grease Pole

Engineering Society President Charlie Scott, Clark Hall Pub’s closure and the resulting dismissal of the Science Constables has had no effect on the faculty’s Frosh Week events.

Traditionally supervised by pub staff, all activities, including tomorrow’s famed Grease Pole climb, will be monitored by AMS Student Constables.Continue...

Personal details given on need-to-know basis

In the event of an incident like the shooting at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in April, the police and the coroner’s office are the only people who have legal authority to ask Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) for personal information, said Dr. Mike Condra, director of HCDS. On Wednesday B.C. Privacy Commissioner David Loukidelis said B.C. law allows a university to share a student’s confidential medical records if there’s a perceived threat to public safety, regardless of the student’s age.Continue...

Politics students left high and dry

This year’s pre-registration period brought an unpleasant surprise for many upper-year politics students. After logging on to QCARD in July, they found most of the courses they needed to complete their degrees were already full.

Class enrollment caps at 55 students at the third-year level and 19 students at the fourth-year level.

The politics department had originally scheduled 28 courses at the third-year level and 32 at the fourth-year level. Four courses were cancelled before pre-registration because the instructors left without enough time for the department to find replacements.Continue...

New administrator up for a challenge

David Mitchell, newly appointed vice-principal (advancement), has big shoes to fill—but he’s not worried.

After all, Mitchell took the high-profile job because he was intrigued by the challenge.

“It’s both a challenge and an opportunity,” he said. “It provides the opportunity to play the role of matchmaker.”

The vice-principal (advancement) job involves raising money and deal-making for Queen’s from alumni, donors and corporations, and comes with a salary of $279, 147.14.Continue...

News In Brief

Ongoing Queen’s Centre construction will continue to affect vehicle and pedestrian traffic across campus throughout the fall semester.

The intersection of Union Street and University Avenue will reopen at the end of September.

University Avenue north of Union Street will reopen in late November.Continue...

Construction security increased as students return

The influx of students to campus for fall semester has prompted the University to heighten security measures at construction sites. This decision came after a man was injured at a construction site near Ellis Hall.

He gained access to the site at about 1:15 a.m. Aug. 16, and was transported by regional ambulance service to Kingston General Hospital for observation, said Campus Security Director David Patterson.Continue...

Queen’s liquor licence legacy

Brian Sterling remembers a time when the biggest problem Clark Hall Pub had was running out of beer.

Sterling was social development convener for the Engineering Society in 1972, when Clark Hall Pub first opened.

On opening night, Sterling said, the new staff tried to provide an incentive for faculty to join students for drinks on Friday afternoon.Continue...

Clark Hall Pub loaned cash from till

The Engineering Society executive closed Clark Hall Pub in June. EngSoc President Charlie Scott and Vice-President (Operations) Rob MacNamara cited budget inconsistencies and liability issues as reasons for the closure.

Erin Hall, the pub’s former business manager, said the practice of employees borrowing money from the pub, referred to as the “Bank of Clark”, has been going on for years.Continue...

‘A crash course in adaptation’

The cell phone sounds its wake-up call at 7 a.m. as I rub my eyes and survey my dusty elephant-patterned mattress. I assess last night’s sweat factor and am thankful that tomorrow night I will get my turn in the fan rotation—it’s part of a deal that I have with my three project partners.Continue...

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