Accessibility

Queen’s alumna makes masks for Deaf people and hard of hearing

After masks were made mandatory in all Kingston indoor public spaces on June 26, the community began feeling the need for personal protective equipment that prioritizes accessibility.Continue...

Queen’s promises to prioritize accessibility concerns ahead of online semester

As the University determines the logistics of offering the fall term remotely, it’s keeping the issue of accessibility in the discussion.Continue...

At first Trustees meeting, principal pledges to restructure office for accessibility

The Board of Trustees gathered for its first meeting of the 2019-20 academic year on Sept. 27—marking Principal Patrick Deane’s first official appearance in front of the Board since he assumed his office on July 1.Continue...

Living with a service dog at Queen's

“Well, what’s your problem?” Phoenix Wilkie Yu (Sci ’21), a third-year student who lives with a service dog, was asked the question on a crowded city bus. Her service dog, Onyx, had just been kicked by a young child. When Yu asked the child’s mother to stop her daughter from doing it again, she was met with anger, rather than compassion.Continue...

No longer ‘treading water,’ AMS Food Bank goes digital

For the first time since opening in 1996, the AMS food bank has eliminated a paper trail of patron identities, switching to a digital system and no longer recording student numbers.Continue...

Invisible disabilities slip through the cracks

When Kaitlyn MacDonald entered Landmark Cinemas in Kingston this summer, she started to cry.Continue...

Arts in Kingston should be accessible to all

Considering it’s 2017 and self driving cars are already a thing, it’s hard to believe how inaccessible things in the world continue to be for people who have a disability like deafness or blindness.Continue...

Academic accommodations aren't academic advantages

As an educator employed at a university, Professor Bruce Pardy has an unusual attitude towards student success. It’s one based on survival of the fittest, or in this case, survival of the those without disabilities.Continue...

Students with special needs need more thoughtful aid

When it comes to finding the best ways to accommodate marginalized students, students with special needs can often be left out of the conversation.Continue...

Living with an invisible disability

For the average Queen’s student, typing or writing notes during class isn’t something they have to stress about. Two years ago, it wouldn’t have been something I stressed about either.Continue...

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