Book review

Queen’s Reads brings focus and feeling to refugee crisis

When two-year-old Alan Kurdi’s death received global attention, the conversation about the Syrian war took on a new tone—and his aunt, Tima Kurdi, was a large part of that shift.Continue...

Considering forgiveness with Canada Reads’ Suzanne

Writing about family is difficult, but forgiving family for past wrongs is even more so—and that’s how Suzanne by Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette succeeds.

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Queen’s alum Iain Reid’s novel Foe sees the future

In the near future, a young couple, Junior and Hen, receive an offer: a clone in exchange for a husband.

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Latest novel by Queen’s Alum falls short of expectations

Mysterious plane crashes, doppelgängers, and shady business transactions are a perfect recipe for a science-fiction classic, but Timothy Taylor’s latest novel misses the mark.Continue...

Lost in Austen after 200 years

On the 200th anniversary of Austen’s death, there is still no sign of her work fading to the background of the literary world.Continue...

Queen’s Reads is The Break you need

After being scrapped for a few years, Queen’s Reads is back with a page-turner.Continue...

Let’s talk about Queen’s Reads

Queen’s Reads is an annual on-campus reading program which distributes a free book to anyone interested. Queen’s Reads Development Coordinator Carolyn Thompson discussed what the program means for...Continue...

Wands out over Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Warning, this article contains spoilers.Continue...

Queen’s student’s debut work parodies dystopian fiction

What do you get when you cross The Hunger Games with a wicked sense of humour? An outrageous novel with immoral characters and a whiplash-inducing plotline. Queen’s student Jake Caldera’s The Elephant on Fire is just that. The novel, which was released in April, follows Hollywood actress Ember Gold on her journey across a developing country where she accidentally starts a revolution.Continue...

Creative writing illuminated from the other side

“Language, which is useful in the province of the intellect is a relatively clumsy vehicle in the expression of emotion and of narrative movement,” Carol Shields wrote in her work Narrative Hunger and the Possibilities of Fiction.Continue...

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