Canadian politics

Landmark summit a chance for change

Being excluded from the law-making table, it's not hard to see why First Nations rights are so poorly addressed.Continue...

Blame boomers for low turnout

Declining youth voter turnout isn't a new trend. But if we keep teaching young voters that the issues they care about won't be addressed, we can expect them to stay away.Continue...

New minority government sitting in the hot seat

Last month, almost 18 million Canadians exercised their democratic right and voted in the federal election.Continue...

Engaging in federal politics is important more often than just once every four years

This year’s federal election was unprecedented in terms of young voter turnout. Now that the election has passed, we have to keep that moment going, not check out of politics until the next time we have the opportunity to cast a ballot.Continue...

How the surging campus vote is changing Canadian politics

In 2015, the “Vote on Campus” initiative saw more than 70,000 ballots cast from students across Canada. In 2019, that number leapt to 111,300.Continue...

Governmental inaction forces youth to carry the burden of social change

In today’s political climate, youth activism has become the new norm. From Greta Thunberg to the “March for Our Lives” organizers, young people are fighting for systemic change with an urgency governmental leaders lack.Continue...

Canadian female politicians deserve better recognition and support

Based on the rate at which women are being elected to Canadian Parliament, it’ll be another 83 years before the House of Commons achieves gender parity.Continue...

The year Rhinos invaded Queen’s

Birds have, for too long, held a monopoly as political parties’ mascots.Continue...

Why you should vote for the party, not their leader

The federal election is nearing, and many Canadians are feeling the pressure of having to make a hard moral decision when they hit the polls on Oct. 21.Continue...

Identity shapes values, making the political personal

Election season in an (unofficially) two-party democracy is always nerve-wracking. The argument constantly resurfaces over which party leader is stronger, or even the lesser of two evils.Continue...

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