Film

How COVID-19 has impacted entertainment

From the onset of the spread of COVID-19 into North America to now, there’s been a stark change in the way the entertainment industry operates.Continue...

Kim's Convenience actress comes to Kingston

Emerging from the ranks of CBC’s hit comedy Kim’s Convenience , Canadian Screen Award-nominated actor and screenwriter Andrea Bang has found her footing in the world of independent film and TV.Continue...

Oscars 2020: Parasite, Jojo Rabbit, and more

After a few years of controversy over the lack of diversity in nominees and award-winners, the 2020 Oscars saw audiences reasonably content with this year’s results.Continue...

Annual Isabel event showcases global voices

This year’s Human Rights Arts Festival is embracing the communicative power of art.Continue...

Reelout brings global LGBTQ+ cinema to Kingston

In 1999, Queen’s student Marney McDiarmid, a member of the OPIRG Kingston, was interested in art and queer activism.Continue...

Banff Mountain Film Festival comes back to town

Since 1992, the Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival World Tour has been stopping into Kingston to display films by creators from all walks of life and levels of experience.Continue...

Full Focus: How a campus film festival built a friendship

As a Film and Media minor, I knew entering university that I wanted to get involved in extracurricular activities that fostered my interest in making videos. Little did I know that, now, as a third-year student, I’d be the video editor at The Queen’s Journal .Continue...

Little Women brings modern feminism to a familiar story

2019 was the year of movie reboots, remakes, and questionable sequels. In a renaissance of retreading familiar stories in film, Greta Gerwig’s adaptation of Little Women proves that some stories do deserve to be retold.Continue...

Three unconventional Indian films to watch this winter break

The winter break is within sight, and with it comes ample time to catch up on streaming TV shows and movies.Continue...

Hysteria over the Joker movie is unjustified

Before the new Joker film was released on Oct. 4, critics feared the filmmakers’ choice to sympathetically portray Arthur Fleck, the character who would become DC Comics villain Joker, would inspire real-life loners to carry out mass shootings at screenings of the movieor elsewhere.Continue...

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