History

Skeleton Park earns its name

Cemetery under Skeleton Park resurfaces after spring thaw.Continue...

One Stop through time

The owners of Campus One Stop open up about their time in the Student Ghetto fixture.Continue...

A tour guide’s timeline of the city Queen’s calls home

Whether you’re just starting at Queen’s or you’ve lived in Kingston for years, there’s probably lots of interesting history about this city that you’ve never learned.Continue...

Ontario’s history curriculum ingrains racism into schools

It was only recently that I became confident in my ability to write an article like this one.Continue...

Featurette: The forgotten impact of George Masoud on Kingston

Between 1901 and 1911 was the biggest wave of immigrants in Canadian history. Among them was George Masoud.Continue...

Featurette: Looking back at the AMS

The Alma Mater Society here at Queen’s is the oldest student association in Canada and has been the primary institution of student government at Queen’s since its founding.Continue...

Workhouse to Welfare

If you walk past 305 Earl Street today, you would see an old, grey brick house with the occasional piece of litter on the lawn. While it’s no different from any other home you’d walk past in the University District, it’s a far cry from what it was 160 years ago.Continue...

Bohemian beauty in Prague’s Mucha Museum

When I went to Prague this summer, I went for everything but its art reputation.Continue...

From silent sisterhood to outspoken alliance

There were five women in the class of 1884. While each would go on to have a prosperous career — a writer, a medical missionary, a teacher, a professor and a doctor — their journeys were not without struggle. Their graduation marked an important moment in history and the beginning of a new era for women at Queen’s.Continue...

Commentary: Who has the right to tell Indigenous stories?

At the crux of the controversy unleashed by allegations that Canadian author Joseph Boyden’s heritage isn’t as Indigenous as he claims is a question readers have to ask themselves as we consider his work: who has the right to tell Indigenous stories.Continue...

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