women

What being a woman means to us this International Women’s Day

This International Women’s Day, we had 23 hours—thanks, Daylight Savings—to think about the contributions and wonderful qualities of women in our lives. From relatives, to friends, to public figures, we are surrounded by incredible women who persist in a world that limits them.Continue...

Chair in Women in Engineering position approved by Board of Trustees

At its December meeting, the Board of Trustees approved a new position for a Chair in Women in Engineering. The position will be in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.Continue...

Apologizing to the women of pop culture

Women in pop culture have always been subject to overwhelming (and, frankly, stupid) criticism for absolutely everything they do.

What follows is a list of women and genderqueer people...Continue...

Women in national sports deserve better recognition

Publications such as Sports Illustrated have hundreds of staff members.Continue...

How research at Queen’s is helping female veterans

Brittany Laramie joined the Canadian Armed Forces in the summer of 2008. At age 17, she was the first woman in her family to serve in the military.Continue...

Canadian female politicians deserve better recognition and support

Based on the rate at which women are being elected to Canadian Parliament, it’ll be another 83 years before the House of Commons achieves gender parity.Continue...

Women at work weighed down by social norms

Working women suffer from the burden of traditional gendered expectations—and it’s destroying their health.Continue...

Women in the workplace deserve better recognition

Just because women are being hired in rigorous professional fields, doesn’t mean they’re being treated equally.Continue...

Menstrual product pilot deserves wider implementation

In 2016, women made up just over half the population in Canada—and many of them, whether wanting to or otherwise, deal with monthly menstrual cycles.Continue...

Mind the confidence gap

The confidence gap is 40 per cent—the difference between the 100 per cent qualifications women feel they need for a job and the 60 per cent men do, according to a Harvard Business Review study.Continue...

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