Arts

Reelout launches online Queer Film Festival

Film promotes advocacy and change while allowing people to escape the struggles of everyday life. Reelout, a local Queer film festival, harnesses these powers of film to foster a sense of community among LGBTQIA2S+ filmmakers while giving individuals a platform for their voices to be heard.Continue...

Union Gallery highlights student art with two new exhibitions

In an emerging digital environment, artistic productions across the globe have moved onto our computer screens and iPhones. Despite digital restrictions, however, Union Gallery managed to keep the spontaneous energy of film and the art of sculpture alive in its two virtual exhibitions, Lens/Visions and Growing ; pains .Continue...

Riley Michaels talks new single ‘Turn Off the Lights’

Before the pandemic, Riley Michaels could often be found playing in bars, soaking up the energy from people having a drink and dancing after a long week. Now he realizes it’s easy to get caught up in work and forget to spend time with the people who matter most.Continue...

The weird world of copyright law

Copyright law originated as a way to protect artists from intellectual property theft, but in today’s context, copyright is too often used as a tool by powerful corporations to supress creativity.Continue...

‘What Alex did best is he didn’t overshadow the contestants’: 'Jeopardy!' winner and Queen’s alum reflects on Alex Trebek

In the wake of Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek’s passing in November and his final episode airing last week, two-time winner Jordan Nussbaum, Queen’s Law ’15, discussed meeting the famous Canadian.Continue...

The Journal talks to an animator on Pixar’s 'Soul'

Inspired by her late grandfather, Emilie Goulet wanted to be an animator since early childhood, which makes her work on Pixar’s Soul , a film that explores themes of celebrating life and embracing death, feel like a culmination of the ambitions he nurtured in her.Continue...

The Blue Stones release new EP ‘Live on Display’

To make up for all the cancelled concerts this year, The Blue Stones have captured the atmosphere of live music on their new EP, featuring performances of their singles at Smash Salvage, an antique store in Hamilton.Continue...

Viveka Melki’s ‘the FENCE’ tackles revisionist history of Japanese POW Camps

Viveka Melki’s the FENCE examines the four-year period during WWII in which 2,000 Canadians suffered incarceration inside Japanese Prisoner of War (POW) camps in Hong Kong and Japan.Continue...

Mike Downie discusses new doc ‘The Covid Cruise’

Mike Downie’s latest documentary The Covid Cruise chronicles the outbreak of COVID-19 on The Diamond Princess cruise ship as it was stranded on the coast of Japan in February.Continue...

Queen’s teaching fellow discusses role of urban art in Indigenous communities

Camille Georgeson-Usher thinks a lot about how street art can foster a sense of belonging in Indigenous communities living in colonial urban spaces.Continue...

Blue Canoe’s 'Voulez-Zoom' brings the magic of Mamma Mia online

Blue Canoe Productions will debut its first virtual cabaret-style show in partnership with its sponsor, Queen’s Musical Theatre, on Saturday.Continue...

Women in Music president discusses organization’s push beyond gender equity to other areas of diversity

According to its president, Nicole Barsalona, the Women in Music (WIM) organization encourages storytelling as a way to inspire younger musicians and show them what’s possible.Continue...

Storytelling and being heard: Indigenous Poet Billie the Kid discusses storytelling through spoken word poetry

Billie Kearns, Sci ’19, commonly known as Billie the Kid, is a K’ai Taile Dené and Nehiyaw spoken word poet and storyteller.Continue...

Poem: We Agreed That I Should Leave You in Toronto

We sit on the couch in your apartment and the clock pushes August away, hands squeezing the thick air to rain.Continue...

'A Mind Spread Out on the Ground' is a stunning meditation on trauma, decolonization, and love

Tuscarora author Alicia Elliott starts her debut book, A Mind Spread Out on the Ground , by comparing depression to colonialism.Continue...

The Journal puzzles out recurrence of hilarious art restoration fails

Eight years ago, in Spain, a well-meaning elderly lady made a disastrous decision to paint over a beloved painting of the son of God, transforming the work into what’s been dubbed Potato Jesus by some, Monkey Christ by others.Continue...

‘Rebellion’: The Journal sits down with David Suzuki to discuss climate resistance documentary

Although David Suzuki has been warning world leaders about climate change since the 1970s, his calls to reduce carbon emissions have fallen on deaf ears. Now, Greta Thunberg rallies the new generation to continue the fight for climate action.Continue...

Muslim International Film Festival makes history in October debut

The Muslim International Film Festival (MIFF) had its inaugural debut in Toronto on Oct. 30. The festival, a celebration of Muslim excellence in the filmmaking industry, was a compilation of eight short films and two feature films presented at the Ontario Place Drive-In.Continue...

Conversations and Slowing Down: two local artists discuss new exhibits

In Studio 22’s latest exhibits, two local artists react to COVID-19. Human beings are mysteriously missing in Erika Olson’s Conversations, a series of vibrantly coloured cakes signifying all the celebrations on hold. In Debra Krakow’s Slowing Down, family members come into focus as the pandemic reminds her what matters most.Continue...

Decolonizing the Agnes Art Centre: in conversation with Emelie Chhangur

In October, Emelie Chhangur became the new director and curator of the Agnes after 17 years as curator at the Art Gallery of York (AGYU). In an interview with The Journal , she discussed how she’s committed to fostering diversity and inclusivity at Queen’s, reimagining the Art Centre’s approach to curation.Continue...

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