Sustainability

It’s not easy being green

Queen’s is well-poised to become one of Canada’s most sustainable university campuses. Rather, it would be, if money was no object.Continue...

Offices get down and dirty with composting

Every week, 64 green bins worth of waste are diverted from the landfills. That’s 200 kg, thanks to an initiative undertaken by the Queen’s Sustainability Office.Continue...

Queen's behind on climate action plan

Two years after signing an important climate change agreement, Queen's has failed to meet certain conditions.Continue...

Energy building

An innovative new laboratory on campus will test the applications of renewable energy sources in housing. The goal is to design a practical net-zero house — meaning that will generate as much energy as it consumes.Continue...

Shift in focus for new commission

The new Commission of Environmental Sustainability will have an increased budget from last year's Sustainability Office.Continue...

A discussion on the bottled water ban

In September, 2012, a ban on the sale of bottled water will take effect. Our panellists discuss the impact this will have and the ethics of water commoditization broadly.Continue...

Commerce professor unearths Queen’s sustainability

Sustainability Professor in the Smith School of Business Steven Moore wants Queen’s to be a moral and sustainable leader through their actions and investments. Moore sat down with The Journal to discuss sustainability on campus.Continue...

Apiary makes its way to Queen’s

The next time you’re near Richardson Stadium, you might notice a buzz of activity.Continue...

Cold beverage consultative group conducting campus-wide survey

In February, Queen’s Hospitality Services announced the formation of a cold beverage consultative group. The group is currently conducting a survey open to students, staff, and faculty.Continue...

ASUS launches textbook service

ASUS launched its new textbook service in January. The service allows students to sell and drop off secondhand textbooks, with ASUS working as a “consignment” by taking five per cent of textbook sales commissions to cover transactional fees.Continue...

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